Common Foods Video with Danielle Fontus

If certain words such as chipotle, espresso and acai make you nervous, you are not alone. Some foods are admittedly easier to pronounce than others. And some make you pause every time you read them. But we are here to tell you that there is no shame in needing to take a minute and sound a word out before ordering. You shouldn’t let anything, let alone pronunciation, stop you from enjoying what otherwise could be an unforgettable dining experience filled with good food and laughter.

Have you ever decided to be fancy and hit up a restaurant you’ve never been to? You dress up, fully willing to broaden your food horizons. But the minute you get the menu and eyeball a few of the dishes, you regret it all. You don’t know how to say any of the selections or if you even want to eat any of them. All of a sudden you’re back in elementary school with beads of sweat on your forehead as you sound out syllables at the table. It’s not a good look, but it is a common dilemma we’ve all faced. However, it doesn’t have to be. Ordering delicious meals should truly be the time of your life.

And that’s why we’re here: to help guide you through those awkward restaurant encounters. There’s no better time than the present to improve your food vocabulary by learning the real way to pronounce common dishes. We continue our handy guide with the help of our friend Danielle, Creator of the She Dares community. The next time you see one of these items on a menu, you’ll impress your friends and bae by sounding like an expert.

  • Edamame – A boiled soy bean, which can be a snack or appetizer before the main dish

  • Lychee – A white fleshy fruit

  • Chipotle – A smoke-dried jalapeño

  • Espresso – A coffee brewed by boiling water under pressure

  • Acai – A reddish-purple fruit.

     

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Traveling While Hungry Facebook

Traveling is one of our favorite pastimes. Nothing is more exhilarating than a new adventure, a change of scenery and amazing experiences you will never forget. But what’s most thrilling? Exploring foods unlike any other we have experienced. That is where the idea for Traveling While Hungry came from.

Traveling While Hungry is a group travel series created for the millennial traveler who wants to take in a new city or country while embracing the native foods of the area. And while it isn’t possible to stop into every great restaurant in town on a one-day trip, it is possible to get a sampling of some of the best foods a city has to offer. Who wants to eat junk food on their entire vacation? Or spend unnecessary coins on hotel room service? Not us. And do not even think about finding a restaurant on your own. Searching for a place to eat via never-ending Yelp reviews is just plain time-consuming. 

Because the focus of this travel series is placed on good food, not just the destination, you can uncover hidden restaurants you wouldn’t otherwise know about. Hitting the road every once in a while to treat yourself to deliciously unique foods is the best. 

The plus is that you do not have to do it alone. During our trips, you can eat whatever your little heart desires with individuals who love food just as much as you do. You will be with people from all walks of life and a variety of interesting places. You can be as spontaneous as you want all while developing new friendships. It takes away the anxiety of traveling and dining alone. 

Want more information on our next stop? Be sure to head to our Facebook group for all the latest updates and discussion.

Watch a clip from our trip to Colombia here.

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Common Foods Video
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Believe it or not, there are tons of common (and not so common) foods that you have probably been pronouncing incorrectly for years. Is it see-tan or say-tan? Is the ‘g’ in gnocchi silent? Do you pronounce caipirinha like piranha? These are just a few questions you’ve probably had while out dining. Spelling can be a bit deceiving, so it makes sense that we have all fallen victim to butchering our food orders.

Let’s set the scene. You head out for a night on the town with your girls. You take a quick glance at the menu, feeling pretty confident as you ask the waiter for pho. Pronouncing it like a childhood enemy, he or she stares at you in confusion because they haven’t the slightest clue what you are talking about. We have all been there.

Mispronouncing the names of your favorite dishes is one of the biggest food faux pas a blossoming foodie can make. But you shouldn’t feel ashamed. And that shouldn’t stop you from experimenting with new menu items. You never want to be too timid to ask for a platter just because you don’t want to say the wrong thing. Life is all about giving anything a try at least once.

That’s why we have taken the guesswork out for you and tracked down a couple of those tricky foods you just can’t seem to say right. With the help of our friend Malandra, the Vegan Diva, you’ll be able to order any item off of the menu and not feel intimidated. Our common foods guide is setting the record straight once and for all.

Four Foods You’re Pronouncing Incorrectly:

  • Pho – A delicious Vietnamese soup with noodles, cilantro and meat

  • Seitan – A soy-bean based meat for vegetarians and vegans

  • Gnocchi – Soft balls of dough

  • Caipirinha – A sweet Brazilian drink you can order right along with your mojitos and margaritas.

     

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Traveling while hungry Philly
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When you think of Philadelphia, your mind probably goes to its infamous cheesesteak. And we don’t blame you; it is a mouth-watering staple. However, you’d be missing out if you thought the food adventure ends there. Philadelphia is also known for a bevy of delectable cuisine that is not only fun, eclectic and tasty, but it won’t break the bank either. We’re talking soft pretzels, hoagies, barbecue hot dogs, Italian rolls and so much more. Don’t want to simply take our word for it? Come and join us for the next installment of our Traveling While Hungry Series as we make a much-needed stop in the City of Brotherly Love.

Departing from Manhattan on April 8, attendees will travel via bus to enjoy all the food Philly has to offer. One ticket covers a full day at the Philly Farm and Food Fest, where you can devour Mid-Atlantic eats (and some boozy libations), share in great laughter and create authentic connections with fellow foodies. And trust us, you’ll have plenty of time to venture out of your taste bud comfort zone. In addition to a cheesesteak run (yum!), the day will include an opportunity to explore the tastiest brunch spots, hit up the Italian Market and take part in the prohibition mixology tour. But no worries! We’ll be hanging as group so you’ll never be alone. Food truly brings people together and you’re guaranteed a memorable experience that will last a lifetime.

Tickets are available for purchase for $147.00 per individual. Please visit link to RSVP and get more details here. Each attendee will also get a Must Eat Guide to help get the most out of their trip. Sound like fun? See you soon!

Click for Tickets

Traveling while hungry Philly

 

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Caribbean Jerk and Reggae Fest

In the mood for some Caribbean spice in your life? Well you’re in luck.The Caribbean Jerk and Reggae Festival is here to fulfill all your taste bud’s desires.

As Brooklyn is known for its heavy Caribbean influence, The Hall at MP is hosting the 12-day event in the infamous borough we know and love. Still going strong in the heart of Williamsburg, mark your calendars as there is only one week left! The fest will come to a close next Saturday on September 3rd, so indulge in handmade spicy Jamaican beef patties, slow-roasted jerk chicken, and braised spicy oxtail under the tutelage of Executive/Owner Michael Psilakis, Michelin starred chef and cookbook author, while you can!

 

Caribbean Jerk and Reggae Fest

Good vibes are also in order featuring the sounds from Brooklyn based The Far East, NYC’s InDaze and Long Island’s Soul Junkies to national sensations like Challenger, Raj Majesty & The New Vibration, and Top Shotta.

Head to The Hall Brooklyn to purchase tickets now but hold out at your own risk as tickets at the door are dependent upon availability. Attendees can opt for a GA ticket à la carte at $15 or go full throttle and pre-purchase a ticket that includes the Caribbean Jerk Platter for $37.

Doors open at 6pm for an hour long, half-off Happy Hour and the show begins at 7pm. You can join in on the fun this weekend or join us next week, when we will be in attendance!

See you there!

Download Our To Eat List Worksheet

How are you keeping up with all these restaurants to go to? We’ve created a To Eat List printable worksheet to help you keep track.

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Sangria Recipe

The beauty of sangria is its versatility. You can switch red wine for white, berries for peaches, gin for brandy, and so on and so forth. There’s a sangria for every mood and tastebud, and today, we’re in the mood for Mango Berry Sangria. This recipe is a slight twist on the classic red wine-citrus combination. Mixed berries mingle with the red wine to bring out the flavors of the wine. Fresh mango and nectar sweeten the sangria without adding additional sugar and gives it a bit of a tropical vibe. Additionally, if you like bubbles in your drink, ginger ale (or club soda if you want something lighter) make this sangria crisp, refreshing, and perfect for sipping. Only five minutes to prep and super delicious, I see no good reason why we all can’t enjoy sangria every day for the rest of the summer!

Sangria Ingredients

Sangria Recipe

Ingredients:

1 750mL bottle of red wine*

1/4 cup orange juice

1 cup mango nectar

4 oz gin (about 2 and a half shots)

1 cup blueberries

1 cup blackberries

1 cup strawberries, hulled and quartered1 cup mango, diced

1 orange, sliced

Ginger ale or club soda
(optional)

Instructions:

  1. Pour the entire bottle of wine into a large pitcher.
  2. Add orange juice, mango nectar, and gin.
  3. Toss in the fruit, leaving aside a few orange slices for garnish.
  4. Stir it all together and place in the refrigerator for a few hours, or overnight if time permits
  5. Ladle sangria into glasses and garnish with a floating orange slice. Optionally, fill glasses three-quarters full and fill the rest with ginger ale.

Pouring SangriafruitsMaking Sangria

*When it comes to choosing a wine, obviously go with something you wouldn’t mind drinking on its own. A crazy expensive bottle isn’t necessary at all. You’ll mix it with all types of fruit and juices which will change the flavor a bit, but wine is the main ingredient nonetheless. If you choose a drier wine like Cabernet Sauvignon, you may want to add a little more sweetness. If you use a sweeter red like Spanish Grenache, you can add a little less sweetness.
Sangria Recipe

 

Let's take a Foodcation!

We’re going to be traveling abroad soon, for food! Be sure to get on our list and find out where we are going next.

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